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Yahoo! News Presents: How Millennials Will Change the Workforce

October 8, 2013 — 1

Yahoo! News recently invited me to appear on its live special exploring the future of the U.S workforce.  See below for my comments on "sidepreneurs," the value of a college degree, and the impact of the Millennial generation on life at the office...

From Yahoo! News' intro:

By 2020, nearly 50% of the U.S. workforce will consist of millennials (according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics) -- that's the generation of people born between 1985-2000. And 25% of millennials expect to jump between six different companies during their careers. That's a drastic change to the way in which the careers of Baby Boomers played out. So how will this change the workforce?  

News

Russian News Anchor Joins Search For Bolislav

October 26, 2009 — 0

She asked that I not reveal her identity because she works for a TV station and is well known in Russia and elsewhere. She's been reading about my search for Bolislav Vainman on SomethingBurning -- how it began when I sent him some money, how my mom weighed in, how Greg Clayman joined the search, and more. Last night, this Russian TV anchor sent me a note, joining the search. She's already begun to research what happened to my "Russian twin," Bolislav, and thousands of other Russian teenagers who, two decades ago, my friends and I sent shitloads of money to. Did they make it out of Russia alive? Where are they now? Was this all a big ponzi scheme? From her email to me: Dear Ross, I don't know if this will help in your search, but I just spoke to a woman familiar with all this stuff. She thinks it wasn't the government who took your money, but a Russian immigrant who came to the US in the 1970s. It had to be someone who was familiar with the concept of a charitable organization here in the US and someone who also knew that American Jews were so sympathetic to all this that they would give money for it. Here's how it worked: Around 1986, people who still had a way to travel to the Soviet Union but were living in the US could come back for some economic opportunity in the Soviet Union...so some guy could have figured all this out in the U.S. and then went to Russia to make this all happen for himself and steal American boys' money. In the Soviet Union, charitable organizations were not trackable. In fact, any documents from the Sov. Union are pretty illegitimate...if they even exist anymore at all, so it would be very difficult to find any traces of such an 'orgnization' there. And a person living in the Soviet Union would not just come up with this...it was someone who had to know the situation here as well and the pressure for American Jews to help and to act on this cause (Frank Lautenberg did a lot for this cause in the Senate...pretty much pushing through legislation that allowed Russian Jews to come here). No one in Russia was giving anyone money or transferring it for that matter, so it all had to have happened from here. Another thing to consider is that there was no way to transfer money over there, especially in 1987 when you sent it. In fact, there was no concept of donation in the Soviet Union. As far as the government stealing it....it's not likely because when people stole money there, they stole big. Billions of dollars, mostly from oil...they didn't care about bar mitzvah money...even Ross Martin's money :-) There were two main organizations helping Jews at the time get out of Russia or live abroad (Italy, Austria, etc.) while they waited to come to the U.S. or Israel: The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee and HIAS (Hebrew Immigration Aid Society). It would be helpful for you to call JDC and HIAS to see if you could track him down that way. There may be a little old lady who's been working there for like thirty years and could remember something or someone like Bolislav Vainman, if he exists at all. I will send you some questions to answer so that I can try to track down more information. Don't give up! And please don't tell anyone my name! - xxx

News

Picture DL Hughley & Michael Chertoff Debating The Torture of Somali Pirates…

August 5, 2009 — 1

Happy to hear last night (at Haru, which is way too loud) that a new format, "The News Has No Clothes," is gaining momentum. After a successful experiment at the Aspen Ideas Festival, it's now getting packaged and shopped for TV. The format brings a performance element back to topical (political) comedy. As Craig Minassian puts it, "stand up comedy is really an editorial." The format gets interesting when you think of the combos, like a Michael Chertoff and a DL Hughley talking about torturing Somali pirates, and whatnot. DL Hughley, Michael Chertoff & some Somali pirates  Craig's a political mastermind, who's been a longtime sherpa for the Clintons. He also co-founded Comic Relief and the HBO Comedy Festival, way back. Minassian Media advises some top TV networks and non-profits on how to become (or stay) relevant. I have worked with Craig a few times, and I've always been impressed at how he fuses comedy, politics and humanitarianism in smart new ways I suspect larger audiences are ready for, now. Together with Stu Smiley and Robert Morton, I feel like what they're doing can really work on the right platforms. I say platforms, plural, because if I were running it, I'd make sure this thing can be sliced & diced for web-wide distribution, becoming news, sometimes in advance of each episode's TV premiere. Here's an already outdated story on what these guys are up to. Curious to see where this show lands... NEW YORK -- Veteran comedy producers and masterminds of the defunct U.S. Comedy Arts Festival in Aspen are returning to the mountain resort as part of this week's Aspen Ideas Festival to try out a format mixing politics and comedy called "The News Has No Clothes." If the stage show works, producers could end up pitching the concept -- described as "The View" and "Politically Incorrect" meet old BBC show "That Was the Week That Was" -- to TV networks for a possible late-night slot. The team behind the idea includes Joe Lang, director of festival producer Jazz Aspen Snowmass and former local producer for USCAF; Craig Minassian, assistant press secretary and director of TV news in the Clinton White House and USCAF director; Robert Morton, former executive producer of "Late Show With David Letterman" and Comedy Central's "Chocolate News"; and Stu Smiley, executive producer of "Flight of the Conchords" and "Everybody Loves Raymond" and a USCAF founder.